Stephen Breyer Biography, Wiki, Age, Career, Family, Net Worth | Who is Justice Stephen Breyer? Bio, Wiki

Spread the love

Who is Stephen Breyer?

Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American lawyer and jurist who has served as associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1994. He was nominated by President Bill Clinton, and replaced retiring justice Harry Blackmun. 

Ketanji Brown Jackson, who was nominated by President Joe Biden, is his designated successor. Breyer is generally associated with the liberal wing of the Court.

Supreme Court Justice Breyer Retiring Thursday—And Ketanji Brown Jackson Will Be Immediately Sworn In

Supreme Court Justice Breyer Retiring Thursday—And Ketanji Brown Jackson Will Be Immediately Sworn In
Supreme Court Justice Breyer Retiring Thursday—And Ketanji Brown Jackson Will Be Immediately Sworn In

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer will retire on Thursday and Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson will be immediately sworn in to replace him, ushering in the court’s first Black female justice—and bringing Breyer’s decades-long tenure on the court to an end as it wraps up a controversial term that saw Breyer’s conservative-leaning colleagues overturning Roe v. Wade.

Before Breyer retires and Jackson gets sworn in, the court still has two notable opinions left to release. One, West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency, will determine how the EPA can regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, potentially hamstringing the federal agency’s ability to fight climate change if the court rules against it.

The other, Biden v. Texas, will determine the fate of the “Return to Mexico” immigration policy first imposed by the Trump administration, which the Biden administration has tried to get rid of but Republican-led states have fought to keep in place.

Stephen Breyer Biography, Wiki

Stephen Breyer, in full Stephen Gerald Breyer, (born August 15, 1938, San Francisco, California, U.S.), associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1994 to 2022.

Breyer received bachelor’s degrees from Stanford University (1959) and the University of Oxford (1961), which he attended on a Rhodes scholarship, and a law degree from Harvard University (1964). In 1964–65 he clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Arthur J. Goldberg. He taught law at Harvard University from 1967 to 1994.

Breyer took leave from Harvard in 1973 to serve as an assistant prosecutor in the Watergate investigation. In 1974–75 he was special counsel to the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, and from 1979 to 1981 he was its chief counsel, working on projects ranging from the federal criminal code to airline and trucking deregulation.

In 1980 he was appointed by Pres. Jimmy Carter to the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, becoming its chief judge in 1990.

In 1994 Pres. Bill Clinton nominated Breyer to fill the seat of the retiring justice Harry Blackmun. As a pragmatic moderate acceptable to Democrats and Republicans alike, Breyer was easily confirmed by the Senate (87–9).

Stephen Breyer Biography, Wikipedia
Stephen Breyer
BornStephen Gerald Breyer
August 15, 1938 (age 83)
San Francisco, California, U.S.
Spouse(s)Joanna Hare ​(m. 1967)​
RelationsCharles Breyer (brother)
Children3
EducationStanford University (BA)
Magdalen College, Oxford (BA)
Harvard University (LLB)

Stephen Breyer Career

In 1994, President Clinton appointed Breyer to the Supreme Court of the United States. Clinton had considered Breyer for a spot on the Supreme Court the year before as well, but Breyer lost the spot to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Breyer was so dedicated in his pursuit to join the highest United States court that he left the hospital to meet President Clinton.

A few days before the meeting, Breyer was hit by a car while riding his bike. He suffered several broken ribs and a punctured lung, but not even these injuries could stop Breyer from attending his meeting. His persistence paid off, and on August 3, 1994 he took his oath to the Supreme Court of the United States.

Breyer is known for being the most pragmatic justice on the bench. His decisions are often guided by maneuvering around the real life consequences to the people affected by the decision. This principle can abandon the strict interpretation some of his fellow justices favor, particularly the more conservatives ones.

Breyer opposes the originalism approach, which is most often associated with Justice Scalia and demands a strict interpretation of the language of the Constitution. Instead, Breyer suggests that the justices follow the Framer’s intent and consider the practical consequences when deciding cases.

Breyer is also well-known for respecting decisions made by the legislature. However this deference does not outweigh Breyer’s desire to consider real-world consequences. In 2000, Breyer wrote a majority opinion in Stenberg v. Carhart which ruled a Nebraska law banning partial-birth abortions was unconstitutional as it interfered too heavily with a woman’s right to decide on her own abortion.

Recently, in 2015, Breyer dissented in Glossip v. Gross, a case dealing with the constitutionality of Oklahoma’s lethal injection process. In his opinion, Breyer wished the court would reassess the constitutionality of the death penalty, a topic the court tackled in the 1976 case Gregg v. Georgia.

Stephen Breyer FAQ’s

Who is Stephen Breyer?

Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American lawyer and jurist who has served as associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1994. He was nominated by President Bill Clinton, and replaced retiring justice Harry Blackmun. 

How old is Stephen Breyer?

Stephen Breyer is currently 84 years old.

Why is Stephen Breyer trending?

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer will retire on Thursday and Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson will be immediately sworn in to replace him, ushering in the court’s first Black female justice—and bringing Breyer’s decades-long tenure on the court to an end as it wraps up a controversial term that saw Breyer’s conservative-leaning colleagues overturning Roe v. Wade.

Also Read:

FOLLOW US ON GOOGLE NEWS
x