David Warner (Titanic Actor) Biography, Wiki, Age, Career, Death, Cause of Death | Who was David Warner? Bio, Wiki

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Who was David Warner?

David Hattersley Warner (29 July 1941 – 24 July 2022) was an English actor who worked in film, television, and theatre.

He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and after making his stage debut in 1962 he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) with whom he played Henry VI in The Wars of the Roses cycle at the West End’s Aldwych Theatre in 1964.

The RSC then cast him as Prince Hamlet in Peter Hall’s 1965 production of Hamlet. He attained prominence on screen in 1966 through his lead performance in the Karel Reisz film Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment, for which he was nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role.

David Warner, ‘Titanic’ and ‘The Omen’ actor, dies at 80

David Warner, ‘Titanic’ and ‘The Omen’ actor, dies at 80
David Warner, ‘Titanic’ and ‘The Omen’ actor, dies at 80

David Warner, a versatile British actor whose roles ranged from Shakespearean tragedies to sci-fi cult classics, has died. He was 80.

Warner’s family said he died from a cancer-related illness on Sunday at Denville Hall, a retirement home for entertainers in London.

Often cast as a villain, Warner had roles in the 1971 psychological thriller “Straw Dogs,” the 1976 horror classic “The Omen,” the 1979 time-travel adventure “Time After Time” — he was Jack the Ripper — and the 1997 blockbuster “Titanic,” where he played the malicious valet Spicer Lovejoy.

Trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, Warner became a young star of the Royal Shakespeare Company, playing roles including King Henry VI and King Richard II. His 1965 performance in the title role of “Hamlet” for the company, directed by Peter Hall, was considered one of the finest of his generation.

David Warner Biography, Wiki

David Hattersley Warner (29 July 1941 – 24 July 2022) was an English actor. Born on 29th July 1941 in Manchester, he attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and worked in the theatre before attaining prominence on screen in the early 1960s through his lead performance in the Karel Reisz film Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment, for which he was nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role.

Warner portrayed both romantic leads and villainous characters across a range of media, including The Ballad of Cable Hogue, Straw Dogs, Cross of Iron, The Omen, Holocaust, The Thirty Nine Steps, Time After Time, Time Bandits, Tron, A Christmas Carol, Portrait in Evil, Titanic, Mary Poppins Returns and various characters in the Star Trek franchise, in the films Star Trek V: The Final Frontier and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, and the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation.

In 1981, he won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Special for his portrayal of Pomponius Falco in the television miniseries Masada.

He died on 24th July 2022, aged 80.

David Warner Biography Wikipedia
David Warner
BornDavid Hattersley Warner
29 July 1941
Manchester, England
Died24 July 2022 (aged 80)
Northwood, London, England
EducationFeldon School
Alma materRoyal Academy of Dramatic Art
OccupationActor
Years active1962–2022
Spouse(s)Harriet Lindgren​​(m. 1969; div. 1972)​
Sheilah Kent​​(m. 1981; div. 2002)​
Children1
Awards1981 Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Special

David Warner Career

Warner’s first big break came on the strength of his small part in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, courtesy of Tony Richardson who cast him in his bawdy period romp Tom Jones (1963) as the mendacious, pimple-faced antagonist Blifil, who vied with Albert Finney for the affections of Susannah York.

Warner’s first proper starring turn on the big screen followed in due course with the title role in Morgan! (1966), Warner playing a deranged artist with Marxist leanings who goes to absurd lengths to reclaim his ex-wife (played by Vanessa Redgrave), including blowing up his mother-in-law. In yet another off-beat satire, Work Is a Four Letter Word (1968), Warner played a corporate drop-out who grows psychedelic mushrooms in an automated world of the future.

Less eccentric roles saw him as the doomed photojournalist who literally loses his head in The Omen (1976) (Warner later described the experience of working alongside Gregory Peck as a career highlight), the sympathetic, but equally ill-fated Klingon Chancellor Gorkon in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991) and the sad, likeable fantasist Aldous Gajic, searching for the Grail in Babylon 5 (1993).

Warner also appeared in a trio of films for which he was handpicked by the director Sam Peckinpah. Best of these is arguably the comedy western The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970), with Warner well cast as the roving-eyed, itinerant Reverend Joshua Duncan Sloane. Warner won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series for his performance as the Roman Senator Pomponius Falco in the miniseries Masada (1981).

Following a three-decade long absence, Warner returned to the stage in 2001 for the role of Andrew Undershaft in Shaw’s Major Barbara. In 2004, he played the title role in King Lear at the Chichester Theatre Festival in England.

More recently, he appeared on TV as Professor Abraham Van Helsing in Penny Dreadful (2014), as Rabbi Max Steiner in Ripper Street (2012) and as Kenneth Branagh’s ailing father in Wallander (2008). A riveting screen presence, the ever-versatile and charismatic David Warner passed away aged 80 from cancer at Denville Hall, an entertainment industry care home, in Northwood, London, on 24 July 2022.

David Warner FAQ’s

Who was David Warner?

David Hattersley Warner (29 July 1941 – 24 July 2022) was an English actor who worked in film, television, and theatre.

How did David Warner die?

Warner’s family said he died from a cancer-related illness on Sunday at Denville Hall, a retirement home for entertainers in London.

How old was David Warner?

David Warner died at 80.

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