Barry Cryer Biography, Wiki, Age, Career, Death, Cause of Death | Who was Barry Cryer? Bio, Wiki

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Who was Barry Cryer?

Barry Cryer, OBE (23 March 1935 – 25 January 2022) was an English writer, comedian, and actor. Cryer wrote for many performers including Dave Allen, Stanley Baxter, Jack Benny, Rory Bremner, George Burns, Jasper Carrott, Tommy Cooper, Les Dawson, Dick Emery, Kenny Everett, Bruce Forsyth, David Frost, Bob Hope, Frankie Howerd, Richard Pryor, Spike Milligan, Mike Yarwood, The Two Ronnies, and Morecambe and Wise. Cryer also wrote episodes for the television comedy series Doctor in the House.

Barry Cryer: Veteran comedian and writer dies aged 86

Tributes have been paid to comedian and writer Barry Cryer, who has died at the age of 86.

Cryer wrote for comedy giants including The Two Ronnies, Bob Hope, Tommy Cooper and Morecambe and Wise.

He was also a star of the airwaves and the stage in his own right, including on BBC radio panel shows like Just A Minute and I’m Sorry I Haven’t A Clue.

His son Bob Cryer said the comedian died “peacefully, in good spirits and with his family around him”.

He added: “He leaves behind him a life of fun, joy, love and silliness and we’ll all be doing our best to maintain that legacy.”

Stephen Fry described him as “one the absolute greats of British comedy”, while actor and writer Mark Gatiss added: “Barry Cryer was the real deal.

“[He was] an incredibly funny man who worked with – and wrote for – the giants of comedy. Yet he remained forever curious and delighted by whatever was fresh and original. Kind, encouraging, generous and a one off.”

In his statement on social media, Bob Cryer continued: “Dad was a talented comedy writer and comedian in a particularly golden vintage.

“It’ll be of no surprise to those that knew and worked with him that he was telling an Archbishop of Canterbury joke to a nurse not long before he died. That was one of his gifts, making strangers feel welcome, making them laugh.”

Tributes flooded in from the comedy world. The Thick of It’s Rebecca Front said Cryer “was an utter genius, endlessly intrigued by and supportive of everyone who worked in comedy…. he made us all feel special”.

Victoria Coren Mitchell, whose father Alan Coren was a long-time friend and colleague of Cryer, remembered him as “a lovely lovely man”. Her husband David Mitchell described Cryer as “a brilliant man and a bringer of huge joy who never stopped being delighted by comedy”.

Benidorm actress Sherrie Hewson said: “Barry Cryer, the most gifted talented extraordinary man I had the honor to work with and more importantly call my friend. A huggable gorgeous human being.”

Comedian Ross Noble tweeted that Cryer’s death was “devastating news”, adding: “He was a legend of his generation and more engaged with the many new generations of writers and comics who followed him than anyone else in the business.

“Spending time with him was always a great joy. Such a funny and nice man.”

Barry Cryer Biography, Wiki

Barry Charles Cryer was born on 23rd March 1935 in Leeds, West Riding of Yorkshire, England. He died on 25 January 2022. By profession, he was an English writer, comedian, and actor. He also wrote episodes for the television comedy series Doctor in the House.

He completes his education at Leeds Grammar School and then he enrolled at the University of Leeds. He was offered a week’s work at the Leeds City Varieties Theatre, home of The Good Old Days, which became the longest-running television entertainment show in the world.

Barry Cryer Biography Wikipedia
Barry Cryer
Birth NameBarry Charles Cryer
Nickname Barry
Profession English writer, comedian, and actor
Famous AsEnglish writer, comedian, and actor
InstagramGo Below
Wife/Girlfriend NameTheresa Donovan
Physical Status 
Age86 Years Old [Died]
HeightIn centimeters- 178 cm approx, In meters- 1.78 mIn Feet Inches-5.10
WeightIn Kilograms- 70 kg approx, In Pounds- 175 lbs
Eye ColourDark Brown
Hair ColourWhite
Shoe Size9 US
Personal Information
Date of Birth 23 March 1935
Birth PlaceLeeds, West Riding of Yorkshire, England
Date Of Death25th January 2022
Place Of DeathEngland
Zodiac signNot Known
EthnicityWhite
NationalityEnglish
School NameLeeds Grammar School
College NameUniversity of Leeds
QualificationsGraduate
Family Profile
Father NameNot Known
Mother NameNot Known
SiblingsNot Known
ChildrenBob Cryer, Jackie Cryer, Tony Cryer, Dave Cryer
Career 
Source Of IncomeEnglish writer, comedian, and actor
Appeared AsEnglish writer, comedian, and actor
Net WorthN/A

Barry Cryer Career

Cryer joined the cast of Expresso Bongo (1957) with Susan Hampshire, Millicent Martin and Paul Scofield, during which he recorded the song “The Purple People Eater”, best known in the version by Sheb Wooley. For contractual reasons, Wooley’s version was never released in Scandinavia, Cryer’s was, and reached number one in Finland. 

Cryer’s first writing credits were four sketches for The Jimmy Logan Show, co-written with Douglas Camfield. Cryer became a head writer with an occasional stage role for Danny La Rue’s London nightclub, where he was spotted by David Frost.

This led to a writing role on the variety special A Degree of Frost, which led to Cryer joining the writing team, which also included John Cleese, Graham Chapman, and Marty Feldman, on The Frost Report from 1966–67.

Frost used Cryer on a number of subsequent shows, which established Cryer as a star writer in the 1970s. Cryer is seen serving the wine in the original performance of the Four Yorkshiremen sketch on At Last the 1948 Show, first broadcast in 1967.

Cryer always preferred to write in partnership, so that should he dry up he was never left to deliver the material. His regular partner during the 1970s was John Junkin, and with Junkin performing as Eric Morecambe and Cryer most often the role of Ernie Wise, the pair wrote some of The Morecambe and Wise Show in its BBC period (the 1972 and 1976 Christmas shows) when regular writer Eddie Braben was unavailable.

Cryer still enjoyed performing, appearing with Tim Brooke-Taylor and Junkin in the BBC radio series Hello, Cheeky!, in which the three performers bounced jokes off each other. He also appeared in the comedy television series The Steam Video Company and provided the voice of the judge in the 1975 animated comedy-musical Dick Deadeye, or Duty Done.

He hosted the ITV comedy panel game Jokers Wild (1969–74) and had a role in All You Need Is Cash, a 1978 spoof documentary about the Beatles parody band The Rutles, as well as a cameo as a police inspector in Kenny Everett’s 1984 horror spoof Bloodbath at the House of Death.

Barry Cryer Personal Life

Cryer was married to his wife Theresa, known as Terry, in 1962. They had four children, three sons, and a daughter. They also had seven grandchildren and, as of 2017, one great-grandchild.

Some Interesting Facts About Barry Cryer

  • Barry Charles Cryer was born in Leeds, West Riding of Yorkshire, England.
  • He was an English writer, comedian, and actor.
  • He joined the cast of Expresso Bongo (1957) with Susan Hampshire, Millicent Martin, and Paul Scofield.
  • He remained a popular after-dinner speaker.
  • He was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 2001.
  • He hosted the ITV comedy panel game Jokers Wild (1969–74). 
  • He had a role in All You Need Is Cash, a 1978 spoof documentary.

Barry Cryer FAQ’s

Who was Barry Cryer?

Barry Charles Cryer, OBE (23 March 1935 – 25 January 2022) was an English writer, comedian, and actor. Cryer wrote for many performers including Dave Allen, Stanley Baxter, Jack Benny, Rory Bremner, George Burns, Jasper Carrott, Tommy Cooper, Les Dawson, Dick Emery, Kenny Everett, Bruce Forsyth, David Frost, Bob Hope, Frankie Howerd, Richard Pryor, Spike Milligan, Mike Yarwood, The Two Ronnies, and Morecambe and Wise. Cryer also wrote episodes for the television comedy series Doctor in the House.

How did Barry Cryer die?

Cryer’s family said he “died peacefully, in good spirits and with his family around him”.

How old was Barry Cryer?

Barry Cryer died at 86.

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